Disability, lifestyle, and nerdy thoughts.

5 Assistive technologies to help disabled and chronically ill people in the workplace

Everyone should have the opportunity to work if they’re willing and able, so it’s important that businesses work with their employees to find the tools they need in order to be successful. For those who might not be sure of what assistive technology might be available, here are 5 examples that can help disabled and chronically ill people in the workplace!

There’s a common belief that disabled and chronically ill people can’t work. That, or they need extreme accommodations to be able to work. While that might be true for some (and that’s totally okay!), many people just need something as easy as an affordable piece of tech. Companies today, at least the good ones, are trying their best to accommodate the need of the increasingly diverse workplace population.

Everyone should have the opportunity to work if they’re willing and able. So, it’s important that businesses work with their employees to find the tools they need in order to be successful. For those who might not be sure of what assistive technology might be available, here are 5 examples that can help disabled and chronically ill people in the workplace!

1. Monitor Magnifying Glass and Computer Settings

Visually impaired workers can now use a magnifying glass app on their computer screen, so they can see the text clearer. Microsoft has also introduced some personalized setting options that accommodate the needs of people who have disabilities that affect their eyesight. You can now set the text size, the contrast level, or even enable text to speech. This way you don’t have to strain your eyes.

2. Standing Desks

Those who have spine injuries and lower back problems can take advantage of standing desks in the office. No matter how ergonomic or comfy an office chair is, it will still put a lot of pressure on the lower back. To protect their office workers’ health and help those with mobility issues, many large companies now offer standing desks with adjustable settings, even kneeling desks, so workers don’t suffer further injuries in the workplace or work through pain or discomfort.

3. Amplified Sound Alerts

Those hard of hearing can now get amplified sound alerts and visual warnings instead of the usual computer sound effects. They are able to communicate with the computer and each other in a faster and more effective way. Those who can improve their hearing through ImprovedSound might not need any adjustments, but those who have hearing difficulties and find it hard to communicate can maximize their productivity using the latest technology.

4. Voice Recognition

Voice commands can be used for most apps, and this option is becoming extremely popular among people who have limited mobility. Instead of typing and straining their wrists, they can now use their voice to complete a task. I know that their are several speech to text programs that are super useful for people with disabilities like mine. Typing can be a slow and difficult process with weak arms, wrists, and hands.

5. Smart Belt

People with a long term health condition, such as epilepsy, will be able to benefit from smart belts that can monitor their body and detect seizures. This is a great example of how technology can be used as a great tool for accessibility by giving people more freedom and independence. The tech was borrowed from lie detectors. It spots the changes in heartbeat and perspiration to alert colleagues or people nearby to act.

Disabled and chronically ill people face so many barriers in life. They often prevent them from being able to work despite having the skills and desire to start a career. There have been so many advancements in technology that can help people like me be successful in the workplace. With that in mind, it’s absolutely crucial that companies are willing to not only hire disabled people, but also listen to the needs of their employees and provide the necessary accommodations!

*This is a collaborative post and may contain affiliate links*



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